Academic Advisory Board

Dr Elizabeth Aitken-Rose

Faculty of Creative Arts and Industries
e.aitken-rose@auckland.ac.nz

Elizabeth Aitken Rose works in the areas of urban planning, specialising in planning history and theory, cultural policy and heritage. She is currently researching cultural planning in local government and has published on subjects as diverse as literary house museums, engineering heritage and engaging young people in planning. Prior to this she worked for the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation Development and for central government. She is currently the Chair of the Frank Sargeson Trust and on the Auckland Council’s Heritage Advisory Panel.

Dr Subeh Chowdhury

Faculty of Engineering
s.chowdhury@auckland.ac.nz

Subeh  completed both her Bachelor of Engineering degree and her Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Auckland’ Faculty of Engineering. She is a Senior Lecturer with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and previously worked for Engineering consults Opus and Beca, working on minor safety projects, speed analysis and crash reduction studies. Subeh specialises in travel behaviour of Public Transport riders. She has a number of papers in reputable journals and has been a frequent attendee of Transportation Research Annual Meeting. Her research focuses on policy making of Integrated Public Transport systems, and designs of transfers with a strong interest in equity. Her research also focuses on women’s barriers to the use of public transport, in particular their perception of safety.

Dr Gerard Cotterell

Faculty of Arts
g.cotterell@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Gerard Cotterell is the Research Services Manager for the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Law. Gerard previously managed the New Zealand Institute for Pacific Research, the Public Policy Institute, the COMPASS research team at the University of Auckland. Gerard is a sociologist with wide-ranging research interests. Current research is focused on data archiving and data re-use, the use of eResearch technologies in social science research, the teaching of research methods, comparative social policy, the political economy of the welfare state, corporate welfare and the periodisation of the process of neoliberalisation.

Catherine Dunphy

Office of the Pro Vice Chancellor Māori
c.dunphy@auckland.ac.nz

Catherine is Kaiārahi for the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Auckland, ensuring that the Faculty makes a positive contribution to Māori and Pacific success. Catherine assists staff to identify and facilitate opportunities where engineering can make a positive contribution to iwi, Māori and Pacific communities, business and industry. Committed to ensuring Engineering our Māori and Pacific students get the most out of their time at the University and Catherine provides advice on how we can ensure that our students achieve academic, personal and professional success, as Māori and Pacific. Catherine is a member of the University of Auckland Council, has worked at the University of Auckland for over 10 years, and has a broad range of experience in policy development, Māori development, education, equity initiatives and Student Engagement & Development.

Professor Prasanna Gai

Faculty of Business and Economics
p.gai@auckland.ac.nz

Prasanna Gai is Head of the Department of Economics and Professor of Macroeconomics at the University of Auckland. His work applies ideas from network and game theory to understand the causes and consequences of financial crises. Professor Gai is the author of two books on financial crises and systemic risk. He holds a Doctorate and a Master of Philosophy (Economics) from Christ Church, Oxford, and a Bachelor of Economics (Hons) from the Australian National University. Professor Gai serves on the Board of the New Zealand Financial Markets Authority, is a Senior Research Fellow at the Deutsche Bundesbank, Frankfurt, an Academic Adviser to the Bank of Canada, Ottawa, and a Fellow of the National Institute of Social and Economic Research (NIESR), London. 

Professor Susan Kemp

Faculty of Education and Social Work
s.kemp@auckland.ac.nz

Susan is a Professor of Social Work at the University of Auckland and a Charles O. Cressey Endowed Professor Emerita at the University of Washington School of Social Work, Seattle, USA. Susan’s research focuses on the role of social, built, and physical environments in shaping the life outcomes of marginalized groups, on intersecting issues of place, agency, and equity, and on the participatory rights of marginalized children, young people and families. Susan has a strong interest in working across disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological borders, partnering with communities and services, and connecting theory, research, and practice. Susan is a co-lead on the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare Grand Challenges for Social Work Initiative, “Create Social Responses to a Changing Environment” and the University of Washington Urban@UW Initiative Regional Editor (Australasia), Child and Family Social Work, and a member of the External Review Board for the Social Service Review. 

Dr Barry Milne

COMPASS
b.milne@auckland.ac.nz

Barry is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Arts, the University of Auckland and the Director of the Centre of Methods and Policy Application (COMPASS).  Barry is a quantitative social scientist and data analyst researching- along with the team of researchers and analysts at COMPASS, well-being across the life course. Barry’s research and analysis focus include a wide range of health and social studies of the New Zealand population cohorts. 

Jefferey Nikoia

UniServices
j.nikoia@auckland.ac.nz 

Jeffrey is the Director of Government Initiatives at UniServices, providing business leadership for Government Initiatives in New Zealand, Australia and the Pcific region. Jeffrey has a history of working with government agencies in New Zealand, Australia and the Pacific in education and research. He is experienced in business relationship management, business planning and development, negotiation, government procurement, partnerships and community engagement. 

Professor Paul Rishworth

Faculty of Law
pt.rishworth@auckland.ac.nz

Paul Rishworth joined The University of Auckland Faculty of Law in 1987. His research interests are in human rights, public and administrative law, and comparative constitutional law. His work on the New Zealand Bill of Rights has been widely cited by peers, practitioners and judges. He is currently a member of the Legislative Design and Advisory Committee and serves as convenor of the New Zealand Law Society’s Human Rights and Privacy Committee.  He was Dean of the Faculty from 2005 to 2010.  He was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 2014.

Associate Professor Tim Tenbensel

Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences
t.tenbensel@auckland.ac.nz

Tim is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, the University of Auckland. His research focuses on health and public policy, health services research and evaluation, including health system performance and governance and accountability of the health sector. 

Dr Jemaima Tiatia-Seath

Pacific Studies
j.tiatia-seath@auckland.ac.nz

Associate Professor Jemaima Tiatia is Acting Pro Vice-Chancellor (Pacific), and Co-Head of School, Te Wānanga o Waipapa, School of Māori Studies and Pacific Studies, University of Auckland. She is of Samoan heritage and has a public and population health background. Her expertise lies in Pacific Studies, Pacific health, mental health and wellbeing, suicide prevention and postvention, health inequities, climate change, and youth development. Jemaima was a panellists on the New Zealand Government’s 2018 Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry and is currently a Board member for the inaugural Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission. 

Professor Michael Witbrock

Faculty of Science
m.witbrock@auckland.ac.nz
Michael is a Professor at the Faculty of Science, School of Computer Science at the University of Auckland. While maintaining a strong interest in knowledge capture and natural language understanding, Michael’s current research goals involve the development and use of quasi-logical systems, which retain approximations of the formal properties of logic while adding the learnability and flexibility of distributed representations and have the full representational power of natural languages. 
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